To honor the successful completion of Mālama Honua and celebrate the achievements of Hōkūle‘a and her crew, Native Hawaiian artist/sculptor Kahikūkalā carved Iwikuamo‘o, an inspired and heart-felt tribute to Hōkūle‘a and her truly remarkable worldwide voyage.
 
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A WORLDWIDE VOYAGE FOR THE AGES,
                     A MONUMENT FOR GENERATIONS TO COME

BACKGROUND

In 2013, Hawaiian voyaging canoe Hōkūle‘a sailed throughout the Hawaiian archipelago to kick off the Mālama Honua Worldwide Voyage. Using only ancient wayfinding practices (that is, navigating by the stars, winds, and waves), the journey covered more than 60,000 nautical miles, stopped at 100 ports, and visited 27 nations around the world. Mālama Honua (taking care of Island Earth) was conceived as a voyage that would grow a global movement toward sustainable living. More than 200 volunteer crewmembers engaged with communities around the world, sharing knowledge on sustainable practices and learning

from the past and from each other. During this voyage, Hōkūle‘a and her crew reached more than 50,000 people and were visited by global leaders such as His Holiness The Dalai Lama, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, United Nations Secretary General Ban Kimoon, Republic of Palau President Tommy Remengesau, Jr., and others.

 

THE MONUMENT

Iwikuamo‘o  is carved from a pōhaku (volcanic basalt rock) sourced from the ahupua‘a of Hakipu‘u, the home of Hōkūle‘a and where Kahikūkalā and his family are kupa‘āina and have the genealogy of kāpuna in service to the ali‘i of this land. The sculpture will be sited at Kualoa Park, near an ahu created in 1995 in honor of master navigator Pius “Mau” Piailug of Satawal (Micronesia), who taught Hawaiians the art of traditional navigation. Sourcing stone from Hakipu‘u and placing it between Kualoa and Hakipu‘u also links the two locations along Kaneohe Bay, sacred waters for voyaging canoes and the very spot from which the maiden voyage of Hōkūle‘a departed in 1975. 

The carved pōhaku sculpture represents the earth, around which a pathway or line, would be carved in relief. This line traces the journey of Hōkūle‘a during the Mālama Honua voyage, forming the so-named Lei of Hope around the world, and a series of piko marks key ports of call during the voyage. 

Iwikuamo‘o was temporarily installed on the shore of Kualoa Park during the Hōkūle‘a’s official homecoming in June 2017. There, it bore witness to the completion of the worldwide journey, while attendees lay hands and offered 'awa and lei to the pōhaku sculpture. The sculpture was well received, resonating with crewmembers and the public alike.

Plans to permanently install the monument at Kualoa Beach are already under way. The City and County of Honolulu's Commission on Culture and the Arts will officially accept the sculpture as a gift from the Polynesian Voyaging Society in January 2018.

 

FUNDRAISING FOR THE MONUMENT

Pu'uhonua Society is currently raising funds to cover the costs and fess associated with the installation of the sculpture, transport logistics, special equipment, concrete pouring, structural engineering, commemoration plaque, etc. Contributions to the Iwikuamo'o project will help ensure that the Mālama Honua worldwide voyage is properly honored for generations to come.



PHOTOS © 2017 POLYNESIAN VOYAGING SOCIETY. 'ŌIWI TV PHOTOGRAPHERS BRYSON HOE AND NA'ALEHU ANTHONY.